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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
years later, i said, i have music for you. do you want to check it out? i was living in new york, i brought the music. he said, i love it. but i't have a band, played the instrument on the demo. i want to sound just like that. i ended up playing all the instruments. you realize, this is serious. it came and a couple of days. keep going. on friday, i said, and the trumpet. i was very intimidated because now you will play the trumpet on something that i wrote. that is not right, but i don't know how to tell and is not right. when will you tell me what to do? i said, i know you know how with this supposed to sound. stop fooling around. don't come in here. after three minutes, it started sounding so good that i got comfortable. he is looking at me like -- tavis: you mentioned sheila, our makeup artist that works here every day. walking around the studio playing never too much. ims luther to this day, that is your project. you must miss him more than i do. >> it is really a big hole that will never be filled. he was singing background and i was playing bass. all these young musicians in
count. what has that space -- being away from the rat race, not being in new york, not being in l.a., what has the solitude done for your songwriting? >> i think it can only have made it better. i think i am stimulated to right by the turmoil of the city, by the confusion and problems, but i am also nearest by the solitude, the closest to the nature region the closeness to nature. people say, what does wilderness mean when you are starving? i get that, but i also does not mean to destroy the wilderness, because when you are not starving you are going to want a place to go and your kids and grandkids are going to want a place to go, so i see it as my responsibility to take care of the problems in the city, but to take care of the wilderness for future generations. we have to. tavis: the love you have given is boundless, and i am glad to have you on this program. this is so unfair to have our life so rich you cannot even scratched the surface. there is a book you can pick up. it is called "a natural woman, written by the one and only carole king. the timing of this is a beautiful th
. tavis: how did new york harry bosch -- how did harry bosch become your guy? >> i think it is because he has a basic idea about fairness that connects to readers. everybody counts or nobody counts. it sounds pretty simple. it is an idealistic view of the world. it is hard to keep going. his efforts to always follow that code, i think -- he is certainly in daring to me because of that. hopefully, that is what translates to be who readers. -- to the readers. tavis: what is your approach, when you are addressing subject matter where race is at the epicenter, like these riot stucks -- like these riots? >> politics intrudes into investigation. harry is relentless, saying, what does politics have to do with justice? you suddenly have to build a story that touches on these things, but does not make any grand statements. i trust the readers to be smart enough to see what is going on, to have the internal discussions. is this the way we want to go? is is reflective of our society now? tavis: are there harry bosch's out there? is he a has been, or they never were? he is a figment of your imaginati
in new york. i read it on the plane and was kind of floored by the quality of the writing, and not just as a movie, but how it understood people. ultimately, the framework and the fabric of the reality of this movie is the financial world and power and money, but you can't really sustain a movie about that. it has to be about people and their relationships and how the choices people make resonate through every aspect of their lives and relationships. so that's what struck me, is the maturity of all the characters in this piece feel rich and textured and real to me in a way that it's rare in the movies today to see. besides the fact that obviously it was talking about something that's meaningful to all of us in the world today. tavis: let's talk more about what the movie is about. we kind of jumped into this, and the audience, i'm sure, is like, okay, give me a little bit more on what the film is about. >> you do that. i hate doing that. tavis: oh, come on. >> you do it. you saw the movie. go ahead. tavis: well, you play a character here who has gotten himself in a situation and has to d
and we hear the voice of "the new york times," like, ooh. then i have to have an awakening. i will get to the point of pain that i finally stopped hitting the snooze button and i go, we're starting over. that is what my faith gives me. i get to start my new 24 hours. whatever time it is, i don't even know what day it is, but at that time, right now, this minute, we're starting over. there is presence and union. we are looking into something so much bigger than our individual egos or destinies' or careers. it is great that we can disseminate information and truth and carry it to people. that is the kind of water we give thirsty people sometimes with what we have figured out. only god will fill that hole. only love, only spirit. you get tired of being half here. always in the future, what is going to happen? there are lots of tools spiritually that people can use. if i wear a gratitude bracelet, it blesses me. i go, stop the train, take a breath. start over now. you kind of do your laws -- lamaz. breathe. tavis: these things are so very important. that notion i raised a moment ago, it al
that i like is out of new york and is the figure skaters in harlem. young children who are taught how to i skate. not just roller skates, i skate. it is nice to give to children. we did not have a lot growing up. those of us to have done so much, we need to bring attention to this kind of things so i am proud. tavis: you do stay busy. >> i stay busy. tavis: anything i have messed up? >> i do not know. i got the gowns. tavis: you got the exhibit in, the solo stuff, the magazine. >> is out there. -- it is all there. tavis: i am honored to have you here. i cannot believe -- >> my new record. been good to me." tavis: the new one is the rock- and-roll project. >> it is the best thing i have done on my own. that is also good but it is not commercial. my jazz is not commercial but it is what i enjoy doing. tavis: life has been good to you. >> i have enjoyed it. tavis: there is no way to calculate all the joy and love that the supremes brought to our lives. >> if i had to come back again i would come back as mary wilson, of the supremes but with a little more money. tavis: if you did i get ba
in a haystack casting. they looked everywhere, australia, london, new york, and l.a., and if the merged i was going to be the guy to play this leader of man -- it emerged i was going to be the guy to play this leader of men. a lot of people did not know about it at this point. it brought to the attention the achievements of this company and major winters. this was my first time playing an american, and i played it i guess convincingly enough for people many years later to still be shocked when they would meet me and i would be speaking in an english accent, so that was gratifying, and we have reunions every year. we feel like we went to war in some way ourselves in the trenches, recreating the story. we became friendly with the veterans that were still alive, and there has been an unusually close bond between them and us and in turn between the actors who portrayed the story. i do not think it was anything like war -- it was not, but it was a tough shoot and an and did notithoot have an auspicious start, because the second episode came out in the week of 9-11. it was a very greedy, real d
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)